Scent Bell: Barn, 2017
wood, ceramics, glaze, acrylic paint, synthetic fur, caprioic acid, 2,6-dimethyl-1,4-hydroquinone, birch tar, mushroom spore prints made from mushrooms collected at CalArts, essential oils from plant material collected at CalArts, metallic paper, mushroom spores, spray varnish
18″ x 18″ x 9″


Scent Bell: Sky, 2017
wood, ceramics, glaze, acrylic paint, silica gel, glitter, nonyl acetate, artificial durian flavor, artificial fruit flavor (generic), synthetic ozone, synthetic rose, synthetic magnolia, essential oils from plant material collected at CalArts.
18″ x 18″ x 12″

Bio:
Wesley Hicks was born in Covina, California in 1990. He studied art at California State University Long Beach receiving a BFA in Ceramics. He is currently Enrolled at California Institute of the Arts working on a duel masters degree in Experimental Sound Practices and Art. He constructs experimental musical instruments and generates multimedia artworks utilizing the mediums of Sound, Scent, and Ceramics. His work creates fractured synthetic versions of the natural world. He has an ongoing collaboration with artist Michael Parker, together having made an ensemble of 100 plus musical instruments called Juicerinas. Performance locations include The Pomona Museum of Art, The Getty Center, The Hammer Museum, and The Palm Springs Museum of Art.

Statment:
Wesley Hicks is a multimedia artist and experimental musician from Los Angeles, CA. His works create fantastical recreations of the natural world. His work calls out the parallels between things viewed as genuine and natural, and those considered inauthentic and synthetic. Utilizing the mediums of sound, scent, and ceramics he creates fractured, synthetic recreations of the natural world. Working with essential oils and plant material from various local plants he recreates the scent of natural spaces. He creates elaborate ensembles of constructed musical instruments that are used to create playful cacophonies of sounds. These instruments often sound like ocks of birds, the ow of rivers, and the calls of whales. He constructed the Juicerinas, 100+ microtonal ocarinas in collaboration with Michael Parker. The Juicerinas are used in ongoing public performances of generative scores and are played by impromptu volunteers at performance venues. Performance locations include The Pomona Museum of Art, The Getty Center, The Hammer Museum, and The Palm Springs Museum of Art.


Website: wesleyhicks.art