Untitled, 2017
cardboard, found paper, silkscreen


Untitled, 2017
found paper, silkscreen

Bio:
I am a Los Angeles-based artist and animal rights activist. I grew up with my mother and three sisters in Southern California. I attended Art Center College of Design and received my Bachelors in Fine Art with Honors in 2012. After graduation, I worked as a freelance Illustrator for several years and exhibited in group shows in Los Angeles. My work has shown in the student gallery at Art Center College of Design, as well as La Luz de Jesus in Hollywood and Giant Robot 2 Gallery in Santa Monica. I have also worked as a printmaking instructor for the Exceptional Children’s Foundation in Culver City and Inglewood for two years before returning to school to currently pursue my MFA at California State University Long Beach.

Statement:
I define my art as art that is practiced in order to envision the world as a place for all creatures to live beautifully and harmoniously, in all of its rawness. It takes away the ancient stigma for the dominion of man over animals. What comes first are the lives of those around us, against core beliefs surrounding Anthropocentrism. It stands as a reminder that the same microbiology makes up all living things, from skin to leaves to scales to fur to teeth to tongues. Our microbiology can be matched, mixed, and mismatched to create all kinds of organisms, yet when we die we all become the same building blocks once again. The endless continuity of life knows no prejudice. My sculptures are meticulously made by hand, colors carefully chosen and placed for each structure, representing the infinite, ordered chaos that is our microbiology. The way in which the pieces are constructed use both careful thought and instinctual cues. I cannot tell you why I use unusual color in a polar bear’s fur, or why there are more teeth in the jaw of a lion than what is scientifically accurate. I can only assure you that it feels right. Each stroke or movement in my prints has purpose and life, representing the cells that make us all, none of which possess a value more or less than the other. The work is about both the beauty and brutality of nature. It does not spare any species from wrath of tooth and claw. Both of these aspects of nature must be observed, acknowledged, and celebrated, for there is no beauty without squalor. My work serves as a reminder of who we once were, reflected in our ancestry, our hopes, our dreams, our childhoods, as well as our contemporary transgressions and lapse of morals and our obsession with the apocalypse.

My work is to present the animal for all that she is: her coat or complexion, her eyes, her many teeth that can rip though flesh like a hot knife through butter, her susceptibility to inhibit cannibalistic behaviors in extreme conditions, her ability to raise and lower her body temperature to survive, how easily you can believe that she understands you, how she makes you feel, and how the world would be without her.